(123) 'The Story Of Jenny's Early Morning Bath'

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Ken
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(123) 'The Story Of Jenny's Early Morning Bath'

Ken
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A few weeks ago my three surviving brothers arrived for yet another visit to our Welsh home.  For more than thirty years my wife, Jenny, has welcomed them and the affection they feel for her is clear to see. During that time she has come to know of their various likes and dislikes and it is second nature for her to make sure they have a pleasant stay, so she gives them what they enjoy most.  For instance, she's come to know my brother Gordon doesn't like tomato's with his breakfast, but Len does.  She knows that Bob enjoys mushrooms as long as the stalks are removed, so she does this for him.  She's also aware that Bob has difficulty digesting toast and I know he appreciates the two slices of freshly buttered bread that she's prepared especially for him each morning.  She knows that one slice will be used, Shamley Green style, to place his egg on, the other will be used a little later with some marmalade.  What I'm saying is that Jenny enjoys being nice in all aspects of her life, particularly with her brothers in law.  However, this visit she forgot one important necessity and that gave her an early morning shock no one could have envisaged.

The night before the shock discovery saw Jenny laughing as she witnessed us reliving yet another memory from yesteryear.  As we did so we were sipping some wines that Gordon had brought for us to try and he'd smiled ruefully when Bob described his carefully chosen wines as a pleasant mouthwash. We were speaking about a western film called, 'High Lonesome,' that we'd watched some years earlier and we laughed at how Bob and Lens hearing problems had created a confusion that resulted in them viewing the film differently from the one watched by Gordon and me.  Because of the wonders of the modern world I was able to use my laptop to find the film and show them the exact spot where the confusion had begun.  It involved a scene where the hero, Randolph Scott, was helping a woman look for her missing husband. They'd come across what were then described as red Indians and, when one of them tried to trade a horse in exchange for the woman, she'd screamed in horror.  She'd later explained to Randolph Scott, "That was my husbands horse," but Bob heard the sentence as, "That was my husbands voice."  At that point we'd paused the film for Gordon needed the loo and I went to get some whisky.  Whilst we were gone Len asked Bob what the woman had said and again the incorrect sentence, "That was my husbands voice," was repeated. From that moment onwards the film ceased to make sense to my two hard of hearing siblings.

Oblivious to this misunderstanding, Gordon and I returned and so, with a whisky in each of our hands, the four of us resumed watching the film.  When the inevitable fight with the Indians began and the woman started shooting at them, I recall Bob saying to Len, "Why is she trying to shoot her husband?"  Because the question made no sense I suppose I ignored it, but when the film finished Len and Bob said they couldn't make head or tail of the film, "It was bloody rubbish," they declared.  Gordon sprang to the films defence and I pointed out it had a four star rating but Len and Bob would not be moved, "The worst film I've ever seen," Bob stated, adding, "Why was her husband dressed as an Indian anyway?" How did you get that idea?" I asked, sensing some sort of muddle up had emerged and Bob repeated the, "That was my husbands voice," line that had caused such confusion for him and Len. "HORSE!" Gordon and I shouted in unison, "She said horse, not bloody voice!"  That's when the laughter started and it went on and on and on.  I suppose the beer, wine and whisky we'd consumed during the day helped the mood but I recall falling off my chair, such was my merriment.  That was what my computer was able to recapture during the most recent get together of the brothers Tuffs.  Once again Jenny was reminded of the out of control laughter that had woken her up so many times before and together we pondered on so many good times that we'd shared.  But bemusement rather than amusement awaited my lovely wife the next morning........

At the beginning of this Cosy story I mentioned that Jenny had forgotten to put out an important necessity for the well being of her guests.  That necessity was the two containers that she'd purchased years earlier to store Bob and Lens overnight denture removal, perhaps she'd not liked the early morning sight of two sets of false teeth staring up from the edge of the bathroom sink.  Len was the first to go to bed that night and he didn't mention the absence of the false teeth containers, neither did Bob when he followed shortly afterwards.  Gordon, like me, still has his own teeth, but neither he or I were aware of the dilemma that our brothers had faced because of Jenny's rare forgetfulness.  When I went to bed I took my toothbrush out of the toothbrush mug and cleaned my teeth as per normal.  I confess to not seeing Lens dentures staring up at me from the bottom of the mug but Jenny did first thing the next morning.  She immediately spoke to me about it but said she could find no trace of Bobs false teeth, she presumed he had taken his to his bedroom.  He hadn't, for fifteen minutes later after her morning bath she took the lid of the Talcum powder holder and discovered, staring up at her in all their glory, Bobs set of gnashers.  He obviously hadn't seen the white talcum powder inside, perhaps because its container was also white, so he had unknowingly plonked his dentures in the fine powder.  Not satisfied with that, he'd then covered them with water before going for some much needed sleep.  So that's the story of Jenny's early morning bath, one she'll obviously never forget.  Instead of pampering herself with the talcum powder in the normal way, she was washing the stuff off Bobs bloody teeth.  I'd have left it on them just to hear him question why his breakfast tasted so strange but, as I've said many times, Jenny's a much nicer person than I'll ever be!
 
Ken
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Re: (123) 'The Story Of Jenny's Early Morning Shock'

Ken
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This post was updated on .
Routine is a splendid thing for those approaching their later years for, in its way, its comforting to know what the day holds in store for us.  This Cosy memory tells of a surprise that two of my brothers inadvertently gave to my wonderful wife, ensuring the start to her day was far from routine!