(98) 'My Magnificent Inheritance'

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Ken
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(98) 'My Magnificent Inheritance'

Ken
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This post was updated on .
My breakfast this morning was supplied by the, 'Posh Bird,'egg company and today I chose to eat a duck egg. Tomorrow, there's every possibility I will enjoy a hens egg for I like to ring the changes.  There is nothing predictable about the adventurous life of Kenneth Ulysses Napoleon Tuffs.  Earlier, I'd awoken to a smiling Jenny and, as I sipped the tea she'd brought me, I'd listened to the radio four, 'Today,' programme. The subject being debated was loneliness amongst elderly men, and I wondered if such an emotion could ever enter my life?  For some reason I then recalled an observation Jenny once made regarding me.  She'd said, "Considering the busy life you've led, you handle solitude surprisingly well!"

That busy life began in a household of ten people with all the noise and activity that went on within our crowded home. The village green near to our house was a gathering place for the dozens of baby boomer children who, like me, had been born in the mid to late 1940's.  If the weather meant I couldn't play outside, I'd find a friends home to visit or I'd invite others to play at my house.  In those happy childhood days I was always busy. When my early teenage years arrived the perpetual motion continued and later a motor bike broadened my horizons even further.  It was now not only our village youth club I could visit, but also those held in Cranleigh, Shere, and far away Peaslake.  The magnificent pub crawling years with Bush, Bojey, Maxi and Speckitt came next and they merged with the activity of the start of my business career. What followed were my superb hustle and bustle years.  They were eventful, demanding, and rewarding in every sense of the word!  I'd met Jenny, got married, and started a family, I'd travelled the country, buying my wares and opening shops.  I'd employed staff, trained them and, when the need arose, dismissed them. I'd handled banks and at times raged at their stupidity and I'd made mistakes, but it was an unmissable experience that moulded the way I think today.  I never had the time to consider loneliness!

Then the wheel turned full circle.  I was still kept busy, but now I was busy just trying to survive.  As I explained in my, Cosy story, No 36, we'd taken in lodgers by the score in an attempt to stop the wretched banks from taking everything we owned.  However, after three years of struggle, we finally realised we couldn't win, so we threw in the towel and moved to Wales.  A new way of life began for us all and what an eye opener that was, for me in particular.  For the first time in my four decades of life on this planet, I had no crowd around me.  I had no siblings close by, no friends, no staff, no companies trying to sell to me and no sycophantic fools to tell me what a genius I was.  Now, there was just Jenny, Kathryn, Morgan, Winston the dog and little ol' me, experiencing a life of  near solitude.  To my surprise I discovered I enjoyed this quieter life style just as much as the manic one I'd lived for so long.  I realised I was completely satisfied with my lot and what I really loved was not money or success or kudos, but life itself.

Jenny was right, I was able to handle solitude well.  For that reason I know I will never suffer from the curse of loneliness spoken of on the, Today,' programme.  'Kens Cosy,' is another reason that solitude is of no concern for it keeps me close to those I care about.  It has also reunited me with good people from my past.  Recently my nephew Shaun visited and, as we supped some late night whisky, he asked me if I had any remaining ambitions, I was able to answer, "No," and it was a good feeling to realise I'm ambition free. However, the main reason I don't envisage being lonely is I possess the contentment gene, I inherited it from my parents. I'm completely satisfied with who I am and I delight in having nothing to prove, not even to myself.  So I will continue living my life of utter contentment, a perfect mixture of solitude and silence, combined with company and chat.  I will end today with a rather large dram of whisky and I will then go to bed with just one, vital, decision to make on the morrow, and that is with regard to my posh bird egg.  Will it be boiled, fried, poached or scrambled, will I chose a duck or a hens egg, and will my bread be toasted!
                                                 
Ken
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Re: (98) 'My Magnificent Inheritance'

Ken
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I once said that a satisfied man is the enemy of progress, but never thought it would refer to me.  This tale is about the danger and delight that contentment offers us all!